Fuck Yeah John Keats

an ode to the poetical genius of john keats

Totally unrelated to John Keats, but here’s a thing I did!

gabriellabella:

Hi guys I did this thing for my friend a little bit ago and decided to record it because why not. A little late to the frozen parody bandwagon but I like procrastinating!

Maybe not safe for work because language.

From Chris: “I thought I’d pass on a link to my latest film, Arterial, it is an adaptation of Keats’ poem La Belle Dame Sans Merci.  You can see it at www.bit.ly/1eefqWgI hope you enjoy it - and feel free to share it if you do!”

the-lokalizer:

Tom Hiddleston reads ‘Bright Star’ by John Keats

'Bright star! would I were steadfast as thou art —
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night,

And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like Nature’s patient sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth’s human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors —
No — yet still steadfast, still unchangeable,
Pillowd upon my fair love’s ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever — or else swoon to death.’

comtesse-du-chocolat:

"Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out of doors by somebody I do not know." — John Keats 
(source: pinterest.com)

If you can’t solve it by drinking tea and reading Keats, well then I don’t know what to say.

comtesse-du-chocolat:

"Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out of doors by somebody I do not know."
John Keats 

(source: pinterest.com)

If you can’t solve it by drinking tea and reading Keats, well then I don’t know what to say.

Benedict Cumberbatch

—Ode to a Nightingale - John Keats

deathcore-pikachu:

Ode To a Nightingale - John Keats

(Read by Benedict Cumberbatch)

Ahhhh, beautiful.

the first love letter to Fanny Brawne

Shanklin,

Isle of Wight, Thursday.

[Postmark, Newport, 3 July, 1819.]

My dearest Lady,

I am glad I had not an opportunity of sending off a Letter which I wrote for you on Tuesday night – ‘twas too much like one out of Rousseau’s Heloise. I am more reasonable this morning. This morning is the only proper time for me to write to a beautiful Girl whom I love so much: for at night, when the lonely day has closed, and the lonely silent, unmusical Chamber is waiting to receive me as into a Sepulchre, then believe me my passion gets entirely the sway, then I would not have you see those Rhapsodies which I once thought it impossible I should ever give way to, and which I have often laughed at in another, for fear you should [think me] either too unhappy or perhaps a little mad.

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19th-century:

John Keats (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was the last born of the English Romantic poets and, at  25, the youngest to die. Along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe  Shelley, he was one of the key figures in the second generation of the  Romantic movement, despite the fact that his work had been in  publication for only four years before his death.

19th-century:

John Keats (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was the last born of the English Romantic poets and, at 25, the youngest to die. Along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, he was one of the key figures in the second generation of the Romantic movement, despite the fact that his work had been in publication for only four years before his death.

(Source: calledback, via book-of-flights)